What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta – May 2020 Archive

Canadian Medical Association president says ‘sick’ health care system unprepared for a second pandemic wave. An ambulance medic wears a mask to protect against COVID-19. Evgeniy Maloletka AP Photo

CBC News Calgary May 26, 2020

Alberta daily history May 2020
What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Wednesday, May 27

There are 714 active cases in the province, 561 of them in Calgary.

Calgarians stroll along a pathway in Eau Claire on Monday. The mayor is asking people to avoid Eau Claire and three other public spaces to avoid crowding. CBC

29 of Canada’s national parks to reopen to day-use visitors June 1

  • Many cancer screening procedures, put on hold during the pandemic, are now resuming, as the Alberta government eases COVID-19 restrictions. As those tests resume, doctors are working to identify roughly 250 breast cancers that went undiagnosed for two months.
  • Alberta confirmed 25 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, and two additional deaths. There were 679 active cases.
  • Calgary’s mayor is asking people to avoid crowding the city’s most popular parks with a simple message: “Don’t be like Toronto.”
  • Lethbridge gym owner Lee Mein says he’s going to reopen his cage fighting gym June 1 regardless of what the law says. He has rallied some like-minded people online, but legal experts say he’s being irresponsible.
  • There were three new outbreaks in the Calgary zone, at Ecco Recycling (five cases), a Walmart distribution warehouse (two active cases and seven recovered) and West Coast Reduction, which does food waste recycling (two active cases and five recovered).
  • The Alberta government has scaled back the provincial COVID-19 news conferences it had been offering every weekday and is now holding them on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
  • Royal Bank and BMO profits cut in half as banks set aside six times more money for bad loans. National Bank profit drops 32 per cent, as loan loss provisions soar.

Travel Alberta launches campaign to get Albertans travelling locally ‘where and when it’s responsible’

Horsethief Canyon is a must see while exploring the Alberta Badlands, says Travel Alberta. It’s on Dinosaur Trail, about 16 kilometres northwest of Drumheller on the east bank of the Red Deer River. Katie Goldie, Travel Alberta

 

What you need to know today in Alberta

Alberta pauses trial of hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 treatment

Alberta reported its first possible case of a new condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C, on Wednesday.

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, said the syndrome is similar to Kawasaki disease and responds to treatments such as steroids.

Two seniors’ residences that experienced deadly COVID-19 outbreaks — one in Edmonton and another in northwestern Alberta — have seen a sharp decline in cases, with only five active cases remaining between them.

This map shows the number of active cases in Calgary as of May 27, 2020. CBC News

Here’s the regional breakdown of cases on Wednesday:

  •  Calgary zone:  531 active.
  •  South zone:  71 active.
  •  Edmonton zone:  52 active.
  •  North zone:  21 active.
  •  Central zone:  2 active.

There are 45 people in hospital and five in intensive care. A total of 242,781 tests have been completed.

Alberta has 679 active cases of COVID-19, lowest number since March 30

This map provides an overview of how COVID-19 has impacted the province of Alberta as of May 27, 2020. CBC News

Across Canada

Here’s what needs to happen before we can all get vaccinated for COVID-19.

Toronto and its surrounding regions account for a disproportionately high number of Ontario’s new cases of COVID-19, according to a CBC News analysis of provincial data on novel coronavirus infections.

A report prepared by the Canadian military about Québec long-term care homes says the division between “hot” and “cold” zones, proper use of protective equipment and staffing shortages remain major challenges in the facilities.

And on Tuesday, the military released a scathing report about the conditions at five Ontario long-term care homes, but many — including the government itself — say problems have been known for years.

As of 7:30 pm ET on Wednesday, Canada had 87,519 confirmed and presumptive cases of coronavirus, with 46,177 considered resolved or recovered. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial data, regional health information and CBC reporting stood at 6,858. Public health officials have cautioned that recorded figures don’t capture information on people who have not been tested and cases that are still under investigation.

Military alleges horrific conditions, abuse in pandemic-hit Ontario nursing homes

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Tuesday, May 26

Province delays plan to have 30% of surgeries privately performed by 2023.

Customers enjoy drinks at Side Street Pub and Grill in Calgary on Monday. Restaurants and bars in the city have reopened for dine-in service. Dave Gilson CBC

Antivirals best defence against a disease that may be here to stay, says COVID-19 researcher

  • Thousands of potential layoffs in the Alberta health-care sector are on hold again as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. The new agreement reached this week among public sector unions and the province means bargaining won’t resume until September, and job protection provisions will remain in place until then.
  • The Alberta government is delaying its plan to move some publicly funded procedures to facilities run by private, for-profit companies, due to the pandemic.
  • As of Monday, restaurants, bars and salons in Calgary can join the rest of the province in Phase 1 of reopening their establishments.
  • Alberta Catholics will be able to return to churches June 1. The Roman Catholic Bishops of Alberta issued guidelines Tuesday, developed following the recent release of the Alberta government’s guidance for places of public worship, as part of the province’s Stage 1 reopening.
  • Alberta confirmed 22 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday. There was one additional death, a woman in her 80s at  JB Wood Continuing Care Centre in High Prairie, bringing the total deaths in the province to 139.
  • There are 714 active cases in the province, 561 of which are in Calgary.
  • There were three new outbreaks in the Calgary zone, at Ecco Recycling (five cases), a Walmart distribution warehouse (two active cases and seven recovered) and West Coast Reduction, which does food waste recycling (two active cases and five recovered).
  • The Alberta government has scaled back the provincial COVID-19 news conferences it had been offering every weekday and is now only holding them on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
  • In Brooks, Alberta, provincial officials set up a testing centre for all residents of the town that have no symptoms following an outbreak at a local slaughterhouse. Both BC and Alberta are testing people in outbreak situations, such as meat plants and prisons.
  • In Saskatchewan and in Calgary, tests are also being offered to anyone working outside the home or those about to return to work as the economy reopens even if they don’t have symptoms.

Commercial rent relief program opens but businesses say it will help few

A sign at Higher Ground cafe requests customers not move tables, which are set up to maintain two metre distances to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Helen Pike CBC

 

What you need to know today in Alberta

Alberta will allow private businesses to buy personal protective gear, including masks and gloves, from the province at fair market prices until June 30,, but after that they’ll need to secure their own suppliers.

This map provides an overview of how COVID-19 has impacted the province of Alberta as of May 25, 2020. CBC

Here’s the regional breakdown of cases on Tuesday:

  •  Calgary zone:  561 active, 4,123 recovered.
  •  South zone:  80 active, 1,146 recovered.
  •  Edmonton zone:  49 active, 462 recovered.
  •  North zone:  19 active, 200 recovered.
  •  Central zone:  3 active, 95 recovered.
  •  Unknown zone:  2 active cases, 22 recovered.

There are 45 people in hospital and five in intensive care. A total of 242,781 tests have been completed.

This map shows the number of active cases in Calgary as of May 25, 2020. CBC

Across Canada

Here’s what needs to happen before we can all get vaccinated for COVID-19.

Québec reported its sixth consecutive daily decrease in the number of people hospitalized for COVID-19 on Monday, as retail stores across the Montreal area reopened.

COVID-19 appears to be infectious for only the first eight days after patients experience symptoms, Winnipeg researchers conclude in a study.

As Brazil and India struggle with surging coronavirus cases, a top health expert is warning that the world is still very much in the middle of the pandemic, dampening hopes for a speedy global economic rebound.

As of 6 pm ET on Tuesday, Canada had 86,636 confirmed and presumptive coronavirus cases, with 45,332 of those considered recovered or resolved. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial data, regional health information and CBC reporting stood at 6,721.

Military alleges horrific conditions, abuse in pandemic-hit Ontario nursing homes

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Monday, May 25

Despite government’s OK to reopen, some businesses are proceeding with caution.

Ernie Tsu, owner of Trolley 5, says the 17th Ave SW brewpub will open Monday, with precautions in place to enforce physical distancing. Dave Gilson CBC

Calgary Muslims celebrate Eid COVID-19-style

  • As of Monday, restaurants, bars and salons in Calgary can join the rest of the province in Phase 1 of reopening their establishments.
  • Alberta confirmed 19 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, and there were three deaths in Calgary, bringing the total deaths in the province to 138.
  • There are 762 active cases in the province, 594 of which are in Calgary.
  • The Calgary Zoo reopened to the public on Saturday with reduced capacity, under direction from Alberta Health Services.

Commercial rent relief program opens but businesses say it will help few

A barista serves coffee from behind plexiglass at a cafe in Calgary on Monday. Helen Pike CBC

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Sunday, May 24

Bars, restaurants, hair salons and barber shops can open on tomorrow in Calgary and Brooks .

A red panda soaks up some sunshine on a frigid day at the Calgary Zoo in 2017. The zoo reopened to a reduced capacity yesterday after implementing new health and safety measures. Andrew Brown CBC

The latest in drug treatment and vaccine development

  • Alberta reported 42 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, bringing the number of active cases in the province to 801. In the last 24 hours 4,015 new tests were completed.
  • There are currently 46 people in hospital.
  • The Calgary Zoo reopened to the public on Saturday with reduced capacity, under direction from Alberta Health Services.
  • Bars, restaurants, hair salons and barbershops can open in Calgary and Brooks on Monday, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announced Friday.
  • Kenney also said that, as of June 1, day camps will be allowed to open with restrictions, post-secondary institutions can offer summer classes with caps on participants, and funeral services and places of worship can expand capacity.
  • The Alberta government is considering changes to the province’s immigration practices, as a result of the pandemic.
  • On June 3, AHS plans to reinstate inpatient labour and delivery and newborn care at Calgary South Health Campus.
  • Alberta’s top doctor warned the public Thursday to be aware of COVID-19 complacency, as the province continues to see new case numbers declining.
  • Boeing laying off hundreds in Winnipeg due to the pandemic.

COVID-19 has made life more isolated for the deaf community

 

What you need to know today in Alberta

Alberta regulator’s move to suspend oilpatch monitoring sets dangerous precedent, critics say

Bars, restaurants, hair salons and barbershops in Calgary and Brooks will be allowed to open on Monday, while more restrictions will be lifted across the province on June 1.

Premier Jason Kenney said the decision to open more businesses and services in the two communities is based on advice from the province’s chief medical officer of health.

Alberta reported 42 more cases of COVID-19 Sunday and no additional deaths.

A new advice line set up to help Albertans with physical disabilities and injuries connect with rehabilitation advice during the pandemic is believed to be the first of its kind in Canada. The toll-free phone line is  1-833-379-0563.

This map provides an overview of how COVID-19 has impacted the province of Alberta so far as of May 22, 2020. CBC News

A regional breakdown of cases as of Sunday afternoon shows the impact of COVID-19 in different parts of the province:

  •  Calgary zone:  629 active, 4,020 recovered.
  •  South zone:  92 active, 1,132 recovered.
  •  Edmonton zone:  55 active, 455 recovered.
  •  North zone:  20 active, 200 recovered.
  •  Central zone:  Three active, 95 recovered.
  •  Unknown zome:  Two active cases, 22 recovered.

To date, 624 cases were due to an unknown exposure.

There are 69 active cases and 640 recovered cases at continuing care facilities; 101 facility residents have died.

This map shows the number of active cases in Calgary as of May 22. CBC News

Across Canada

Federal government launches benefit-finder tool for emergency aid as parties spar over return of Parliament

Ontario Premier Doug Ford urged the public to “please” get tested if they are worried they have symptoms of COVID-19 on Sunday after the province reported its highest new case count since May 8.

In Alberta and in other provinces, public health officers have warned Canadians to not become complacent to the COVID-19 virus as warm weather draws them outside.

Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer, says public health officials anticipate the possibility of a second wave of COVID-19 this fall and winter.

As of 7 pm ET on Sunday, Canada had 84,699 confirmed and presumptive coronavirus cases, with 43,995 of those considered resolved or recovered. A CBC News tally of deaths attributed to coronavirus based on provincial data, regional health information and CBC journalism stood at 6,515.

A CBC News tally of deaths attributed to coronavirus based on provincial data, regional health information and CBC journalism stood at 6,447.

Alberta’s economic angst could have a deep, echoing impact in Newfoundland and Labrador

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Saturday, May 23

Bars, restaurants, hair salons and barbershops can open on Monday in Calgary and Brooks .

Barber Salim Alhaj cuts the hair of Calgary’s John Gee, who came to the Kingsview Barbershop on its reopening in Airdrie on on May 14. Barber shops and hair salons will be allowed to reopen in Calgary and Brooks on Monday. Jeff McIntosh, The Canadian Press

Albertans in BC border towns find hostile reception at times, due to COVID-19 worries

  • Bars, restaurants, hair salons and barbershops can open in Calgary and Brooks on May 25, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announced Friday.
  • Kenney also said that, as of June 1, day camps will be allowed to open with restrictions, post-secondary institutions can offer summer classes with caps on participants, and funeral services and places of worship can expand capacity.
  • The Alberta government is considering changes to the province’s immigration practices, as a result of the pandemic.
  • Alberta reported 18 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, along with one additional death.
  • On June 3, AHS plans to reinstate inpatient labour and delivery and newborn care at Calgary’s South Health Campus.
  • Alberta’s top doctor warned the public Thursday to be aware of COVID-19 complacency, as the province continues to see new case numbers declining.
  • A new advice line has been set up to help Albertans with physical disabilities and injuries connect with rehabilitation advice during the pandemic. The advice line is believed to be the first of its kind in Canada.

Canada Child Benefit recipients getting an extra $300 per child this month

New family support services available to Bow Valley residents. Julie Strang, social connection specialist with Bow Valley Family Resource Network, leads a virtual story time. The Bow Valley Family Resource Network in Canmore is a free provincial program that supports early childhood development and reduces the need for intervention in later years. Julie Strang photo

 

What you need to know today in Alberta

Bars, restaurants, hair salons and barbershops in Calgary and Brooks will be allowed to open on Monday, while more restrictions will be lifted across the province on June 1.

Premier Jason Kenney said the decision to open more businesses and services in the two communities is based on advice from the province’s chief medical officer of health.

Alberta reported 18 more cases of COVID-19 Saturday along with one death — a woman in her 90s, at the Chinook Care Centre in the Calgary Zone.

A new advice line set up to help Albertans with physical disabilities and injuries connect with rehabilitation advice during the pandemic is believed to be the first of its kind in Canada. The toll-free phone line is  1-833-379-0563.

This map provides an overview of how COVID-19 has impacted the province of Alberta so far as of May 22, 2020. CBC News

A regional breakdown of cases as of Saturday afternoon shows the impact of COVID-19 in different parts of the province:

  •  Calgary zone:  641 active, 3,971 recovered.
  •  South zone:  93 active, 1,127 recovered.
  •  Edmonton zone:  55 active, 455 recovered.
  •  North zone:  19 active, 200 recovered.
  •  Central zone:  3 active, 95 recovered.

This map shows the number of active cases in Calgary as of May 22. CBC News

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Friday, May 22

Calgary and Brooks to find out if reopening can proceed .

As the summer of COVID-19 approaches, Albertans are turning to tents and RVs for adventure at a distance. BC Parks Facebook

Alberta campgrounds will open next month with 50% occupancy, no out-of-province campers

  • Bars, restaurants, hair salons and barbershops can open in Calgary and Brooks on May 25, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announced Friday.
  • Kenney also said that, as of June 1, day camps will be allowed to open with restrictions, post-secondary institutions can offer summer classes with caps on participants, and funeral services and places of worship can expand capacity.
  • Alberta reported 32 more cases of COVID-19 Friday and two more deaths.
  • On June 3, AHS plans to reinstate inpatient labour and delivery and newborn care at Calgary South Health Campus.
  • Alberta’s top doctor warned the public Thursday to be aware of COVID-19 complacency, as the province continues to see new case numbers declining.
  • A new advice line has been set up to help Albertans with physical disabilities and injuries connect with rehabilitation advice during the pandemic. The advice line is believed to be the first of its kind in Canada.

Canada Child Benefit recipients getting an extra $300 per child this month

Growing resilience: What could a secure food system look like? The Cargill beef plant in High River, Alta. Months before it became the site of North America’s largest COVID-19 outbreak, people were warning about the insecurity of Canada’s food system. Jeff McIntosh, The Canadian Press

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Thursday, May 21

Alberta to implement temperature screening at Edmonton and Calgary airports.

How Parks Canada online reservation system buckled — again. Recreational vehicles parked in the Banff townsite. Finding a spot to camp in Banff National Park can be a challenge, as tens of thousands of users flood the online reservation site the moment it opens. Robson Fletcher CBC

Angry and powerless: Temporary cuts to education will hurt vulnerable Alberta kids, advocates say

  • Alberta’s top doctor warned the public Thursday to be aware of COVID-19 complacency, as the province continues to see new case numbers declining.
  • The province reported four more deaths and 33 new cases on Thursday.
  • Brooks, which was Alberta’s No. 1 hot spot for COVID-19, is now looking forward to a return to some normalcy with its JBS meat plant ready to start ramping up production again. It goes back to two shifts starting today.
  • This week, there were three new outbreaks reported in the Calgary zone, as the city awaits a decision from the province – whether it will be safe to reopen restaurants and salons.
  • There are now 16 outbreaks at businesses in the Calgary zone, and 17 outbreaks at seniors’ homes.
  • International travellers face enhanced COVID-19 screening at Alberta airports.

Watch  Travel bubbles considered for regions with low cases

Brooks moves toward new normal after outbreak. The entrance to the city of Brooks, Alberta. Things are slowly returning to a new normal after the peak of an outbreak linked to workers at the city’s JBS meat plant. Dan McGarvey CBC

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Wednesday, May 20

The financial fallout from the pandemic could force Edmonton to stop transit service this summer.

Edmonton buses and LRT could stop running this summer due to the impact of the pandemic on city finances. David Bajer CBC

Angry and powerless: Temporary cuts to education will hurt vulnerable Alberta kids, advocates say

Epidemiologists brace for 2nd wave — and it may come in September. People walk, ride bikes and inline skate along Queen Elizabeth Driveway in Ottawa on May 3. Justin Tang, Canadian Press

 

What you need to know today in Alberta

The devastating impact on the budgets of Alberta’s cities is coming into focus, as Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson says the city could shut down public transit this summer in order to deal with the shortfall.

Cities aren’t allowed to run deficits and are facing a severe cash crunch from loss of revenues and increased costs. Transit alone is costing the cities millions each month. Mayors of both major cities have called for emergency funds from both the province and the federal government.

On the health front, however, the province reported its lowest count of known new cases since April 9, but the province’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, warned it’s still too early to tell whether the first stage of reopening the province has had an impact on spread of the virus.

The total number of cases in Alberta as of May 19. Evelyne Asselin CBC

The number of active cases in Calgary as of May 19. Evelyne Asselin CBC

A regional breakdown of cases, as of Tuesday afternoon, shows the impact of COVID-19 in different parts of the province:

  •  Calgary zone:  784 active, 3,773 recovered.
  •  South zone:  99 active, 1,105 recovered.
  •  Edmonton zone:  59 active, 450 recovered.
  •  North zone:  18 active, 197 recovered.
  •  Central zone:  6 active, 92 recovered.
  •  Unknown:  4 active, 20 recovered.
What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Tuesday, May 19

Active cases continue to fall in Alberta, with 33 new cases reported on Tuesday.

The breakdown of cases across the province, as of May 18. Evelyn Asselin CBC

Watch  What we know, what’s probably not true, and what we need to find out

  • Calgary and Brooks will learn on Friday whether hair salons, barber shops, bars and restaurants can open on May 25.
  • The province will give more than $14 million a month in extra funding to the operators of continuing-care centres, nursing homes and assisted-living facilities to pay for more staff and for extra cleaning during the pandemic, Alberta’s health minister said.
  • The province reported 33 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday afternoon.
  • A total of 10 people have tested positive for COVID-19 at Alpha House in Calgary, and 10 have tested positive at the Calgary Drop-In Centre.
  • Another resident at McKenzie Towne Continuing Care Centre has tested positive for COVID-19. A $25-million class action suit has been filed against the care home, but it has yet to be certified by a judge.
  • Wildlife experts warn of encounter risks, as Albertans return to parks.
  • A group of Calgary volunteers is filling an AHS order for 12,000 face shields.
  • One economic victim of COVID-19: Calgary’s usually booming Indian wedding industry.

Indian weddings involve gatherings of 100s of guests with many travelling internationally. Weddings are all cancelled for what looks like the whole of 2020 due to COVID-19, leaving business facing an uncertain future. Arshad Chaudhry

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Monday, May 18

The impact of outbreaks on Canada’s major meat processors has some looking to smaller players.

Protesters stand on the side of the road as workers return to the Cargill beef processing plant in High River, Alberta earlier this month. The plant was closed for two weeks because of a COVID-19. Jeff McIntosh, The Canadian Press

After spending months alone at sea, Calgary man surfaces to new reality

Watch  The 1918 Spanish Flu: Calgary’s first pandemic

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Sunday, May 17

Alberta welcomed the Victoria Day weekend by increasing the limit for outdoor gatherings to 50 .

Banff Mayor Karen Sorensen said she hoped visitors will postpone their trips to the community until adequate safety measures have been put in place. louisjkruger, Flickr

Alberta Parks overwhelmed by high demand for camping reservations

Researchers use smartphone data to determine which businesses are potential COVID-19 ‘super-spreaders’

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Saturday, May 16

Alberta is increasing limits on outdoor gatherings, just in time for the long weekend .

Beltline urges city to make walking ‘safe and comfortable’ with physical distancing. Alberta streets are sure to be busy this long weekend, as residents seek to get outdoors and enjoy the warm weather. Helen Pike CBC

Alberta Parks overwhelmed by high demand for camping reservations

  • Alberta is increasing limits on outdoor gatherings to 50 people from 15, as long as proper physical distancing is maintained, Dr. Deena Hinshaw announced Friday.
  • Alberta reported 72 new cases of COVID-19 and one additional death on Saturday. The total number of cases in Alberta grew to 6,587, according to the province, of which 1,084 were active. Sixty people were in hospital, eight in intensive care.
  • The latest death was a man in his 90s from the Intercare Brentwood Care Centre in Calgary zone. Ninety-two of the total 126 deaths due to the disease were residents in continuing care facilities.
  • Provincial parks are open over the long weekend, but some facilities remain closed and campfires are not permitted. Campsites will not reopen until June 1.
  • YMCA Calgary has cancelled the majority of its summer programming, including day and overnight camps.
  • Health-care aides at long-term care homes say they’re still in the dark about wage top-ups promised by government.
  • Alberta public health officials say they will likely know within a week whether reopening leads to a new wave of COVID-19.
  • The province reported four more COVID-19 deaths and 58 new cases on Friday.

What works to flatten the curve and what science says on easing restrictions

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Friday, May 15

With some restrictions lifted in most areas, province should know within a week if a second wave hits.

Here’s what Calgary’s Market Mall looked like if you went shopping on the first day of Alberta’s Stage 1 relaunch. 1:53 CBC

Alberta Parks overwhelmed by high demand for camping reservations

Class of COVID-19: Inventing high school graduation celebrations they will never forget

 

What you need to know today in Alberta

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health says the province should know within a week if yesterday’s reopening of bars, restaurants and some other businesses in most areas will lead to a surge in new cases.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw also encouraged Albertans to wear masks when going out to recently reopened spaces, but stopped short of mandating their use.

In Calgary, where restaurants and bars did not reopen, Mayor Naheed Nenshi asked Calgarians not to flock to nearby towns and cities without those restrictions.

Besides having more cases than any other jurisdiction in the province, the Calgary zone has also been the site of several workplace outbreaks. An update on those outbreaks was provided on Thursday:

Cases Active Recovered Deaths
Amazon Fulfilment Centre, Balzac 13 2 11
APS Calgary 32 9 23
Calgary Alpha House 8 7 1
Canada Post, Calgary 6 2 4
Cargill, staff and contractors, High River 950 16 932 2
Calgary Refrigerated Warehouse, Calgary 17 4 13
Calgary Drop-In & Rehab Centre Society, Calgary 5 3 2
Cascade Recovery+, Calgary 22 20 2
Flyers Force, Calgary 13 6 7
Harmony Beef, meat-packing, Rocky View County 40 5 35
Midtown Co-op, Calgary 17 3 14
Purolator, Calgary 68 30 38
Continuing care in the province 755 100 569 87

There are now 1,073 active cases in the province, while 5,317 people have recovered and 125 have died.

​On Friday, 62 people were in hospital, nine of them in intensive care.

Here is a regional breakdown of Alberta cases as of Friday:

  •  Calgary zone:  870 active, 3,505 recovered.
  •  South zone:  106 active, 1,069 recovered.
  •  Edmonton zone:  61 active, 444 recovered.
  •  North zone:  18 active, 195 recovered.
  •  Central zone:  13 active, 85 recovered.
  •  Unknown:  5 active, 19 recovered.
What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Wednesday, May 13

Province will announce partial reopening of economy on Wednesday, but not in Calgary and Brooks.

Take-out only. Seed N Salt, a quick-serve restaurant on Fourth St. SW in Calgary will not offer dine-in service, even though the province will allow restaurants 50 per cent seating capacity beginning on May 14, 2020. Submitted by Heather Merrett

What Canada can learn from other countries about lifting lockdown measures too soon

Stress, anxiety a heavy burden for people who can’t work from home or properly isolate

What to expect when restaurants, stores and hair salons reopen. A lone person rides an escalator past a shut cafe in downtown Calgary amid the COVID-19 pandemic closures. Jeff McIntosh, The Canadian Pres

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Tuesday, May 12

Businesses now have some guidance for possible reopening on Thursday.

A food server wearing a protective face mask waits on customers in St. Petersburg, Florida. Some restaurants in Alberta could be open as early as Thursday. Chris O’Meara, The Associated Press

Watch  The problems in long-term care that COVID-19 could change

Calgary doctor worries about vulnerable workers, as some businesses prepare to reopen

Stress, anxiety a heavy burden for people who can’t work from home or properly isolate

Evelyne Asselin CBC

Evelyne Asselin CBC

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Monday, May 11

Alberta reported its highest number of new cases since last week, as May 14 reopening nears

Lessons from a war zone: How to emotionally survive and flourish in the pandemic. Dr. Aisha Ahmad is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Toronto, and the director of the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School. She’s also chair of the board of Women in International Security Canada. Emily Agard

Watch  New warnings about COVID-19 complications in children

What works to flatten the curve and what science says on easing restrictions

Evelyne Asselin CBC

Evelyne Asselin CBC

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Sunday, May 10

Provincial health officials will open a temporary second centre to test for COVID-19 in Brooks

Asymptomatic testing centre set up in Brooks, as 7% of city’s population tests positive. A sign outside JBS meat-processing plant in Brooks AB thanks workers for continuing to show up during the pandemic. Hundreds of workers at the plant have now contracted COVID-19. CBC

Labour advocates call for Alberta meat-packing plant to close as they mourn workplace deaths

Calgary Sikhs step up to feed Calgarians during pandemic

Epidemics and resilience: How the Algonquin have faced nearly 200 years of disease outbreaks and survived. Boys in Timiskaming or Temagami circa 1913. Frank Speck/American Philosophical Society

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Saturday, May 9

The province reported its first case of COVID-19 in an Alberta correctional facility

Canmore mourns Marvin the friendly elk. The visiting elk was friendly with many animals, including magpies. Beate West

  • There is now an outbreak linked to Canada Post’s main plant in Calgary, Alberta Health Services said Friday.
  • The province has reported its first case at an Alberta correctional facility — an inmate at the Calgary Remand Centre.
  • Another 59 cases of COVID-19 were reported in Alberta on Saturday, for a total of 6,157. One more person has died.
  • Number of confirmed cases worldwide surpasses 4 million.

Busy trailheads and COVID-19 fears prompt Canmore, Banff to ask travellers to stay away

Mountain Living: What it’s like to be settled under their majestic shadows. Commuters drive over a bridge in Banff. It’s hard to imagine but some locals say they stop noticing the mountains from time to time, once they’ve settled into their daily routines. ICI Radio-Canada Ouest

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Friday, May 8

Premier Kenney says it’s unlikely all parts of the province will reopen at the same time .

Local Heroes: Food writer teams up with top Calgary restaurant to make thousands of bagged lunches for kids. Saskia Reynaud helps assemble sandwiches at her father’s restaurant, Rouge. Co-owner Paul Rogalski’s daughter is also on the assembly line. Meghan Grant CBC

In 2 weeks, this Alberta city went from just a few cases of COVID-19 to the province’s biggest hotspot

Alberta’s COVID-19 tracking app is flawed but worth using, experts say

What is contact tracing? Here’s what you need to know. Alberta Health ABTraceTogether is a mobile app that uses Bluetooth technology to trace and prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Alberta. Josee St-Onge CBC. In the  Apple App Store and ▶︎ Google Play
More users needed: Lessons from Alberta’s coronavirus contact tracing app

 

What you need to know today in Alberta

The pandemic has not played out the same across all areas of Alberta, with High River and Brooks being overwhelmed, while areas to the north have been largely spared.

Even in the two biggest cities, the difference between levels of infection has been pronounced.

To that end, Premier Jason Kenney said on Thursday that not all regions of the province are likely to open up at the same time and on the same timeline. It’s expected more will be announced on Tuesday, as the May 14 target for the first phase of a relaunch nears.

Alberta recorded one more death to COVID-19 and 81 new cases, Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Friday.

So far, 115 Albertans have died from the disease, with the province reporting 6,098 total cases as of Friday.

Of those cases, the number of people listed as recovered is 4,020, well above the 1,963 active cases.

“It is encouraging to see these numbers coming down from last week because it means fewer people are experiencing severe outcomes from this virus. It also means our health-care system has the capacity to handle potential additional COVID-19 cases if needed.”

A regional breakdown of cases, as of Friday, shows the impact of COVID-19 in different parts of the province:

  •  Calgary zone:  4,109 cases
  •  Edmonton zone:  508 cases
  •  South zone:  1,133 cases
  •  North zone:  227 cases
  •  Central zone:  97 cases
  •  Unknown:  24 cases

So far 166,327 people have been tested for COVID-19 in Alberta, including 3,332 tests in the last 24 hours.

Advice for Mother’s Day

Hinshaw noted many people will be celebrating Mother’s Day this weekend.

“I know this year will feel a little different, but I hope you can find time and ability to connect with your loved ones, even if it is in a different way,” she said.

“For those planning to celebrate the occasion by visiting a family member in a continuing care facility, please remember the rules around masks, physical distancing and the need to call ahead.”

She warned Mother’s Day is difficult for those who have lost a mother or for mothers who have lost a child.

“These feelings may be even more overwhelming during this time of isolation. Continue to check in with your loved ones about how you can support them,” she said.

Contact tracing key to successful relaunch

No matter where Albertans elect to spend time this summer, Hinshaw urged them to download the contact-tracing app ABTraceTogether and keep it open on the phone when in public.

“I cannot overstate how important contact tracing will become as we open up our economy and people begin moving around more,” she said.

So far 140,000 people have downloaded the mobile app. It uses Bluetooth technology to help contact tracers track cases and warn people who may have been exposed to the novel coronavirus.

“Contact tracers will need the help of the app to track new cases in the coming weeks and months,” Hinshaw said.

“If we cannot rely on that information, contact tracing will take longer, the virus may spread further and we may have to reconsider pulling back on our relaunch steps and putting restrictions back in place if the virus spreads at a high rate.”

Friday’s news conference was the final one of the week. No news conferences are scheduled for Saturday or Sunday. Weekend updates will be provided through online reports and news releases.

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Thursday, May 7

Advocates are demanding changes in long-term care homes and daycares are anxiously awaiting guidance.

Daycare operators are awaiting guidance from the province on reopening. Marina von Stackelberg CBC

The pandemic paradox: Canadians asked to go out and face threat that kept them inside for weeks.

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Wednesday, May 6

Plenty of questions, as target date for reopening some businesses approaches.

‘We have to step up.’ Puffed up pita breads come out of the oven at Samir Omar’s northeast bakery. These breads are destined for the Calgary Food Bank. Dan McGarvey CBC

From personal protective equipment to Plexiglas, owners plan for reopening businesses safely.

Alberta dentists struggle to get enough PPE to resume procedures.

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Tuesday, May 5

Health official says Albertans need to remain vigilant, even as new cases start to fall.

Alberta campgrounds will open next month. Alberta’s summer camping season has been delayed and restricted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Online reservation system will reopen on May 14. Wallis Snowdon CBC

Watch    How to mix cleaning agents safely

Watch    Yuval Harari finds optimism and opportunity

$252M emergency aid for farmers and processors. The government is also expected to add $125 million to the AgriRecovery fund, a federal-provincial-territorial program aimed at helping farmers during disasters. Marcio Jose Sanchez, The Associated Press

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Monday, May 4

Province of Alberta reports two consecutive days of less than 100 new cases.

Dog parks were reopened in Edmonton on the weekend as restrictions begin to ease. Emily Rendell-Watson CBC

Out-of-work pilots fly masks to COVID-19 hot spots in southern Alberta.

We’ve lived with social distancing long, long before the arrival of COVID-19: Josée Legault CBC Radio

Public health officials take seriously new research that children may not be superspreaders after all. ‘It’s a very interesting and exciting study,’ says Dr. Stephen Freedman, pediatric emergency medicine physician at the Alberta Children’s Hospital. He’s the lead scientist for a global study into the impact of COVID-19 on children. CTV News photo
Cases of children with rare inflammatory syndrome spike in Italy and France

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Sunday, May 3

The Cargill meat-packing plant near High River is set to reopen tomorrow.

Cargill is one of the two primary beef suppliers for McDonald’s Canada, and normally processes about 4,500 cattle per day at this time of year. Jeff McIntosh, The Canadian Press

What we know and don’t know about immunity to COVID-19

Liberals hasten high-speed broadband access plan in response to pandemic

People enjoy the reopening of VanDusen Botanical Garden in Vancouver on Friday. Two park board-run golf courses — Fraserview and McCleery — and VanDusen Botanical Garden, reopened Friday to visitors with physical distancing measures in place. Ben Nelms CBC.

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Saturday, May 2

The province has unveiled a new app designed to help Alberta slow the spread of COVID-19.

Albertans can now download an app that monitors if the user has come in contact with a COVID-19 patient. The province says ABTraceTogether will help fight the pandemic but as Fletcher Kent explains, there are some privacy concerns. Global News

Scientists aim to ‘see’ invisible transmission of coronavirus

EI claimants are going weeks without income, as federal call system slows to a crawl

 

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Alberta on Friday, May 1

Province will reopen slowly with provincial parks today, golf courses on Saturday.

Golf courses will reopen in Alberta this weekend, but clubhouses and retail shops will remain closed. Glenn Reid CBC

Alberta to take first steps to open economy on Saturday, with emphasis on outdoor activities

Why can I get a haircut, but not see my friends? Your COVID-19 questions answered

People were taking photographs of fenced-off cherry blossoms at a park in Toronto on Friday. Nathan Denette, The Canadian Press

 

 Find coronavirus local updates
Your local guide to the coronavirus outbreak. Get the latest advisories, updates and cancellations for where you live.
 Calgary cancellations, closures and other updates.
Report notices to be included by emailing  calgarynewstips@cbc.ca
 Edmonton cancellations, closures and other updates.
Report notices to be included via email  webedmonton@cbc.ca
   Canada and around the world – CBC Timeline
May 2020
May 28
May 27
May 26
May 25
May 24
May 23
May 22
May 21
May 20
May 19
May 18
May 17
May 16
May 15
May 14
May 13
May 12
May 11
May 10
May 9
May 8
May 7
May 6
May 5
May 4
May 3
May 2
May 1
April 2020
April 30
April 29
April 28
April 27
April 26
April 25
April 24
April 23
April 22
April 21
April 20
April 19
April 18
April 17
April 16
April 15
April 14
April 13
April 12
April 11
April 10
April 9
April 8
April 7
April 6
April 5
April 4
April 3
April 2
April 1
March 2020
March 31
March 30
March 29
March 28
March 27
March 26
March 25
March 24
March 23
March 22
March 21
March 20
March 19
March 18
March 17
March 16
March 15
March 14
March 13
March 12
March 4
2019–20 coronavirus pandemic data/Canada medical cases. Wikipedia

From hanging out in parks to getting groceries, how can you navigate day-to-day risks of COVID-19? Living life during a pandemic can be confusing. But experts say you can navigate how to approach different settings and activities once you know the risks. 1:11 CBC
Coronavirus testing isn’t ramping up with reopening. Even though Canada is slowly reopening, testing isn’t ramping up to match the rising risk of infections. That worries experts, and has the federal government offering assistance. 2:04 CBC
Some regions with low COVID-19 cases, including some Canadian provinces, are considering creating so-called travel bubbles to allow people to move freely within those areas, but experts say the concept has many flaws. 1:59 CBC
Two months into the pandemic, infectious disease specialists break down what we know about COVID-19 — the information that sounds true, but probably isn’t, and what we still need to find out. 6:11 CBC
The 1918 Spanish Flu: Calgary’s first pandemic. At news of the Armistice on Nov. 11, 1918, Calgarians pulled down their masks, set caution aside and celebrated wildly. A Calgary history lesson from the 1918 outbreak of H1N1, improperly called the Spanish flu, with Harry Sanders. 4:49 CBC
Deadly 2nd wave of Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 may hold clues for reopening today
Watch    A history of polio in Canada
An inside look at Canada’s COVID-19 detectives. The National’s Adrienne Arsenault spends a day with contact tracers in London, Ontario, who help figure out where someone caught COVID-19 and determine who else may be at risk. 3:43 CBC
Experts answer questions about the COVID-19 pandemic two months after it was declared. 6:40 CBC
Advocates for seniors say the COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the fragility and inadequacy of care for older Canadians, and footage from a CBC Marketplace investigation highlights that a lack of standards for staffing was a problem before the COVID-19 crisis. 6:01 CBC
After decades of systemic issues, time to finally overhaul Alberta long-term care, experts say
Canadian doctors watching for inflammatory illness in children as part of COVID-19 diagnosis. After three children died in New York, questions are being raised about possible links between an inflammatory syndrome and COVID-19 in children. 3:39 CBC
Experts predict a surge in the number of businesses applying for bankruptcy because of the financial toll of the COVID-19 pandemic. 1:56 CBC
Researchers are looking into a possible link between COVID-19 and Kawasaki syndrome, a rare inflammatory disease. A medical expert explains the disease. 8:06 CBC
Could COVID-19 be linked to a rare childhood inflammatory illness?
Cases of children with rare inflammatory syndrome spike in Italy and France
Businesses are having to evaluate how to operate safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, and for a Vancouver artisanal ice cream company it means not opening their stores after restrictions start to lift. 2:02 CBC
Andrew Chang explains that if you’re wearing a cloth mask during the COVID-19 pandemic the best way to disinfect it is to wash it. 1:15 CBC
Some cities are looking at ways to change outdoor spaces to allow for physical distancing, including closing roads to traffic. 1:57 CBC
Yuval Harari finds optimism and opportunity in COVID-pandemic. Philosopher, historian and author Yuval Harari talks to The National’s Adrienne Arsenault about taking an optimistic look at how the world is adapting to the pandemic through co-operation and trust in science. 4:15 CBC
Canadians are accidentally poisoning themselves while cleaning to precent infection. Jim Chan shows how some common cleaning products can be used safely to disinfect your home against the virus. 2:32 CBC
As travellers land in BC, they are expected to have detailed quarantine plans and will receive followup calls a few days later. 2:07 CBC
Some personal support workers are using the same protective mask multiple times a day while going in and out of care homes because they worry about running out. 2:03 CBC
COVID-19: Is airborne transmission possible? An infectious disease specialist answers your questions about the COVID-19 pandemic including whether airborne transmission is possible. 2:18 CBC
Why speaking ‘moistly’ could be partly to blame for the rapid spread of COVID-19 Quirks & Quarks, CBC Radio
Some Scientists Say Just Breathing or Talking May Spread COVID-19. Here’s What We Know Science Alert
Talking with and without a mask, courtesy The New England Journal of Medicine ©2020. This video, from a study published April 2020 in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health, uses laser light scattering to show droplets produced when someone speaks. 0:42 CBC
Visualizing Speech-Generated Oral Fluid Droplets with Laser Light Scattering, Philip Anfinrud PhD, Valentyn Stadnytskyi PhD, Christina E. Bax BA, Adriaan Bax PhD, NEJM. April 15, 2020. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2007800
Droplets and Aerosols in the Transmission of SARS-CoV-2, Matthew Meselson PhD. NEJM. April 15, 2020. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2009324
Six feet is not always enough: How saliva droplets spread through the air IEEE Spectrum
On coughing and airborne droplet transmission to humans, Talib Dbouk, Dimitris Drikakis. Physics of Fluids 32, 053310 (2020); https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0011960 Published Online: 19 May 2020
The airborne lifetime of small speech droplets and their potential importance in SARS-CoV-2 transmission, Valentyn Stadnytskyi, Christina E. Bax, Adriaan Bax, Philip Anfinrud Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences May 2020, 202006874; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2006874117
Our adrenaline can’t ‘outpace’ COVID-19, but Brené Brown offers 3 tips to better cope. Recognizing novelty of situation is key, says author and podcast host. Dr. Steven Taylor, author of  The psychology of pandemics: Preparing for the next global outbreak of infectious disease, explains more. 0:52 The Current, CBC Radio

Also see
COVID-19 info for Albertans Government of Alberta
Some internationally trained doctors can apply for 30-day Ontario licence to fight COVID-19 CBC
Your guide to COVID-19 and its impact on life in Canada CBC Health
A fundamental shift: Nearly half of reported COVID-19 cases in Canada now from community spread CBC Health
Some children with COVID-19 become seriously ill, study finds CBC New Brunswick
Coronavirus: When Canadian compassion requires social distancing The Conversation
‘Take this seriously’: Edmonton man is Alberta’s first COVID-19 fatality, total cases reach 146 CBC Edmonton
Some children with COVID-19 become seriously ill, study finds CBC New Brunswick
Information for Albertans – novel coronavirus (COVID-19) Alberta Health Services
Your guide to COVID-19 and its impact on life in Canada CBC News
Here’s how Calgarians are helping their community during the COVID-19 pandemic CBC News
City of Calgary declares a state of local emergency in response to COVID-19 pandemic CBC News
Do I have COVID-19, the flu or a cold? CBC Explains
What we know (and don’t know) about the coronavirus outbreak CBC Explains
Travelling during the coronavirus outbreak? Here’s what you need to know right now CBC News
Timeline of COVID-19 cases across Canada CBC News
COVID-19: Why are cruise ship passengers quarantined and not self-isolated at home? CBC News
Stay home, save lives: How Canada could avoid the worst of COVID-19 Second Opinion, CBC News
U of C suspends in-person classes due to COVID-19 CBC News
COVID-19: Albertans urged to cancel all gatherings of more than 250 people CBC News
Dozens of Calgarians asked to self-isolate after child tests positive at daycare CBC News
Government warns against all international travel, limits inbound flights to stop spread of COVID-19 CBC News
A Newfoundlander is leading the global fight against COVID-19, and wants you to know the facts CBC News

MOBILITY MENU
   403-240-9100
Call 403-240-9100